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For the fifth year in a row, the College Board named Lake Washington School District (LWSD) to its Annual AP District Honor Roll. LWSD is one of only 373 public school districts in the United States and Canada and one of four in Washington state to be honored. Lake Washington is one of two districts in the state to be a multi-year recipient of the AP Honor Roll Award.

At its December 3 meeting, Lake Washington School District’s (LWSD) Board of Directors passed Resolution No. 2259 to place a Capital Projects Levy on the April 23, 2019 ballot. This measure, if passed, authorizes a six-year levy totaling $120 million or an average of $20 million per year for six years. 

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    Assistive Technology Tools by Area

    The LWSD Assistive Technology team works with general and special education teachers to provide medium and high tech tools for students. Low tech tools are often already available in the classrooms.

    Reading support

    For students who face challenges with reading, there are a range of Assistive Technology tools that may help. Please see below for potential AT resources to support reading, including text-to-speech readers, vocabulary support, and access to digital texts.

    Tools

    Low-Tech

    • Book holder/easel
    • Enlarged text
    • Change text spacing, color or background/contrast
    • Magnifiers
    • Color overlays
    • Tracking strategies - reading window, bar magnifier
    • Predictable books
    • Thesaurus
    • Dictionary - classic dictionary, picture dictionary and/or talking dictionary
    • Books on tape
    • Picture symbols
    • Highlighter tape
    • Annotation or notes templates (digital or pen and paper)
    • Outlines (digital or pen and paper)
    • Graphic organizers (digital or pen and paper)

    Mid-to-High Tech

    • Text-to-Speech (TTS) allows students to hear and see text as it's being read aloud.
    • Optical Character Recognition (OCR) reads text aloud from images and pictures. Students can use OCR by scanning or taking a picture of worksheets or other documents.
    • Graphic organizers: visual representations of ideas and concepts, such as diagrams and mind maps. Graphic organizers are helpful when taking notes while reading and can assist with comprehension and recall.
    • Bookshare

    Software

    Microsoft OneNote Learning Tools

    The OneNote Learning Tools add-in enables OneNote to read a page to you (text-to-speech). It also allows you to dictate within OneNote (speech-to-text). Please see AT staff for writing for more information on Dictate. Learning Tools can be downloaded to district devices using Software Center or accessed here. Once the add-in is downloaded, it will appear as a tab when you open OneNote.

    Getting Started and FAQs

    Microsoft Immersive Reader

    Immersive Reader offers speech-to-text (read aloud). It also offers font support, reading ruler for focus, color contrast, syllable awareness and language selection, such as verbs, adjectives, etc. Immersive Reader allows a student to personalize the speed and style of their reading.

    How to send to OneNote:

    How to access:

    • OneNote 2016 (Desktop)
      • Access from Start Menu
      • From Learning Tools tab, select Immersive Reader
    • OneNote Office 365 App (Online)
      • Access from Office 365 online
      • From View tab, select Immersive Reader
    • OneNote Windows 10 App
      • Access from Start menu
      • Reading supports: from View tab, select Immersive Reader
    • Microsoft Word Office 365 App (Online)
      • Access from Office 365 online
      • From View tab, select Immersive Reader
      • Microsoft offers a "Read Aloud" feature for editing and misspelled words: right-click on underlined word to hear and see options.
    • View steps for adding additional languages

    Text-to-Speech Software (elementary & middle school)

    Snap & Read
    • Snap & Read is a Text-to-Speech, read loud software. It can read almost anything on the screen.
      • Works across applications/software, websites, and PDFs
      • OCR Reader for inaccessible text (Pictures, PDFs)
    • How to access: Download in "Software Center"
      • After download, application will be in Start Menu.
      • First, click on the icon and then select the area you want to read.

    Read Write 12 (elementary, middle & high school)

    Read&Write logo: purple puzzle piece that says "rw"Read Write 12 is a floating toolbar that offers student support in a variety of applications and software, such as Word, OneNote and Internet Explorer. Its features include:

    • Word prediction
    • Text-to-speech
    • Screen masking
    • PDF reader
    • Dictionary/picture dictionary
    • Highlight tools that collect information
    • Vocabulary list builder

    Read Write 12 works best with Microsoft Word, PDFs and Internet Explorer. For more tips and tricks, please reference the links below:

    • Read Write 12 Support
    • Read Write Quick Reference Card
    • Texthelp Toolmatcher
      • Use this toolmatcher to narrow down which Read Write tools can best meet your needs
    • How to access:
      • Application is on the desktop of district devices
      • The software is installed on all secondary student devices automatically. It will be in the students' list of available programs.
      • It is available to all elementary students, teachers and specialists for download from the Software Center.

    E-text & Digital Resources

    Many of our curricula offer accessible educational materials in online versions of their text. Work with your student's teacher to fine out if a digital version is available.

    In addition, the school library is a good place for your child to find information. Through the school library, students have access to a diverse collection of print and electronic materials. The librarian can provide assistance.

    Clicker 7

    Clicker 7 icon: red, blue and yellow overlapping squaresThis software is available to all elementary students, teachers and specialists for download from the Software Center. Clicker 7 is also available for elementary students to download on their home computers.

    Clicker 7 is a literacy support software tool. It has a talking word processor, word prediction and text-to-speech to support student's reading and writing skills. Clicker also has "Clicker Sets” which give students point-and-click access to whole words, phrases and sentences for a variety of literacy activities.

    Interested in having Clicker 7 at home? Email SSAssitiveTechnology@lwsd.org to place a request.

    Writing support

    LWSD provides low to high tech Assistive Technology for writing. Students may need writing supports due to weaknesses in motor skills, attention, language, memory and higher order thinking. Tools to support writing include word prediction, electronic graphic organizers, vocabulary supports and speech-to-text or text-to-speech readers.

    Low-Tech

    • Pencil grips
    • Specialized paper
    • Sentence strips
    • Graphic organizers
    • Slant boards

      Mid to High-Tech

      Word Prediction

      A feature in an app or program that reduces the number of keystrokes necessary for typing words. Word prediction is available in Co:Writer, Clicker 7, and Read&Write 11.

      Text-to-Speech

      Allows students to highlight text and have it read aloud to them. Text-to-speech is available in Learning Tools for OneNote for all students, Snap&Read for elementary and middle school students, and Read&Write 11 as UDL tools. Other programs currently supported by the district include Co:Writer 7 and Clicker 7.

      Speech Recognition (SR or Speech-to-Text)

      Speech recognition is a popular feature available to all LWSD students in Learning Tools for OneNote. SR allows students to speak their words instead of typing. To use speech recognition for writing, students need to think of a sentence and keep that sentence in their memory. Then, they need to say the sentence, check the spoken sentence for accuracy and fix errors.

      Speech Recognition for Learning on the Reading Rockets website

      Speech Recognition as AT for Writing

      Clicker 7

      Clicker 7 icon: red, blue and yellow overlapping squaresThis software is available to all elementary students, teachers and specialists for download from the Software Center. Clicker 7 is also available for elementary students to download on their home computers.

      Clicker 7 is a literacy support software tool. It has a talking word processor, word prediction and text-to-speech to support student's reading and writing skills. Clicker also has "Clicker Sets” which give students point-and-click access to whole words, phrases and sentences for a variety of literacy activities.

      Interested in having Clicker 7 at home? Email SSAssitiveTechnology@lwsd.org to place a request.

      Read Write 12

      Read&Write logo: purple puzzle piece that says "rw"

      Read Write 12 is a floating toolbar that offers student support in a variety of applications and software, such as Word, OneNote and Internet Explorer. Its features include:

      • Word prediction
      • Text-to-speech
      • Screen masking
      • PDF reader
      • Dictionary/picture dictionary
      • Highlight tools that collect information
      • Vocabulary list builder

      Read Write 12 works best with Microsoft Word, PDFs and Internet Explorer. For more tips and tricks, please reference the links below:

      • Read Write 12 Support
      • Read Write Quick Reference Card
      • Texthelp Toolmatcher
        • Use this toolmatcher to narrow down which Read Write tools can best meet your needs
      • How to access:
        • Application is on the desktop of district devices
        • The software is installed on all secondary student devices automatically. It will be in the students' list of available programs.
        • It is available to all elementary students, teachers and specialists for download from the Software Center.

      Math support

      Assistive Technology for math allows students to demonstrate their knowledge and participate in meaningful ways. Tools to support math include digital manipulatives, digital worksheet completion, digital graphing and handwriting-digital text support.

      Tools

      Low-Tech

      • Number lines
      • Math facts sheets/charts (100s Chart)
      • Multiplication tables
      • Rekenrek boards, counting ropes or abacuses
      • Manipulatives
      • Flash cards of numbers, integers, concepts or operations
        • Students can assemble expressions or receptively identify solutions
      • Rubber stamps for numbers/graphs
      • Graph paper or templates to organize math problems
      • Graphing tools or drawing tools
      • Worksheets with enlarged print and space for solving
      • Modified paper (bold lines, raised lines, grid paper)
      • Calculators

      Mid-to-High Tech

      • Writing or drawing support
      • Virtual worksheet completion
      • Equation and expression support
      • Digital or virtual graphing
      • Digital or virtual manipulatives
      • Digital or talking calculators
      • Text-to-Speech (TTS)
        Reads text aloud, allowing students to hear and see the text as it is being read.
      • Optical Character Recognition (OCR) Reads text aloud from images and pictures. Students can use OCR by taking photos of worksheets and other documents or by scanning documents.

      Software

      Microsoft OneNote

      Microsoft OneNote 2016 (Desktop)

      • Access from Start Menu
      • Math Supports:
        • Add grid paper: From View, select Rule Lines, from drop down menu, select Grid Lines
        • Build equations: From Insert, select Equation.
          • Equation Tools Design bar will pop up
        • Insert math problems: From Draw, select Ink to Math
        • Use or draw Shapes: From Draw, select Shapes
        • Worksheet completion:
          • Send worksheets to OneNote 2016
            • Option 1: Attach File as Printout
            • Option 2: From Print, select drop down option Send to OneNote
          • Right-click and select Set as background
          • Write or type on top of worksheet.
          • Once a worksheet is in OneNote 2016, it can be worked on in synced notebooks in any of the OneNote products.

      OneNote Windows 10 App

      • Access from Start menu
      • Math Supports:
        • Build or solve equations: From Draw, select Math Tools. Math toolbar will pop up on right.
          • Write or type equation. Select your equation with the Lasso Select Tool (under Draw). Click on Math Tools again. Use the dropdown to select the action you want, such as solve, show steps or graph it.
        • Use Ruler: From Draw, select Ruler
        • Use or draw Shapes: From Draw, select Shapes or Ink to Shape
        • Insert math problems: From Insert, select Math Tools
          • Use pen or finger to write equation.
          • Select it with the Lasso select.
          • Ink to Math (to turn into text) and/or Select an Action from the drop down menu.
        • Solve equations
        • Graph

      Microsoft Word 2016 (Desktop)

      • Add Grid paper: From View, select Grid Lines
      • From Insert tab, select Equation
      • Insert math problems: From Draw, select Ink to Math
      • Use or draw Shapes: From Draw, select Ink to Shape; or from Insert, select Shapes

      Read Write (middle and high school)

      • Offers a talking calculator
      • Text-to-speech (read aloud)

      Snap Read (elementary and middle school)

      Text-to-speech tool

      • Screen Reader can read directions or problems aloud
      • OCR Reader can read scanned documents or photos

      Digital Text and Resources

      Many of our curricula offer accessible educational materials in online versions of their text. Work with your student's teacher to fine out if a digital version is available.

      In addition, the school library is a good place for your child to find information. Through the school library, students have access to a diverse collection of print and electronic materials. The librarian can provide assistance.

      Dyslexia support

      Assistive Technology for dyslexia includes graphic organizers. Using graphic organizers, students can create visual outlines, such as mind maps, to help them understand what they are reading.

      Please see Reading support and Writing support above for more dyslexia support tools.

      Communication support

      Assistive Technology can help students with little or no verbal communication. AT tools to support communication include:

      • Single and multi-message voice output devices
      • Dynamic display devices with voice output

      AAC (augmentative and alternative communication) allows for students with limited or no verbal communication to participate in communication activities. IEP team members, including Speech Language Pathologists, work in partnership to create a functional communication system for students. Communication systems range from low-tech communication books to high-tech dynamic display devices. The Assistive Technology team can be consulted if a therapist or IEP team is unsure what the best system is for a student.

      Vision support

      Students with low-vision often require assistive technology to access their educational materials. The Assistive technology team works with Vision teachers to provide screen magnifiers or software, accessible devices, cameras and screen sharing capabilities.

      Tools

      Tools

      • Screen magnifiers
      • Screen magnification software
      • Enlarged text
      • Braille
      • Handheld magnifiers

      Services

      If a student is referred for a functional vision evaluation, and the team agrees, services will be provided by the TVI and/or O&M specialist. Services might include any of the following:

      • Consultation with staff/parents/students
      • Providing information to families on school/community resources
      • Training on methods of gaining access to the curriculum, technology or environment
      • Providing accessible materials (large print books, Bookshare, etc.)
      • Providing specialized equipment and instruction for use
      • Braille instruction
      • Instruction to improve visual efficiency.
      • Instruction in the expanded core curriculum (ECC):
        • Direct instruction
        • Consultation
        • Explaining options in the general education curriculum
        ECC is the body of knowledge and skills students with visual impairments need due to their unique disability and specific needs.

        ECC should be used as a framework for assessing students, planning individual goals and providing instruction.

      Resources

      • Washington State School for the Blind, Vancouver, WA. (WSSB)
        Once placed on an IEP or Section 504 plan, students are registered at WSSB by the TVI. WSSB can provide materials, large print books, short courses, training, etc. Contact is made through the TVI or O&M specialist.
      • Department of Services for the Blind (DSB)
      • Washington Talking Book and Braille Library (WTBBL)
      • American Federation of the Blind (AFB)
      • National Federation of the Blind (NFB)
      • Association of the Education and Rehabilitation of Blind and Visually Impaired Students and Adults (AER)
      • Lighthouse for the Blind
      • Helen Keller Services for the Blind
      • Perkins Institute for the Blind
      • American Printing House for the Blind (APH)
      • National Braille Press
      • Bookshare
        • Upon identification, all students are signed up by the TVI for a Bookshare account.
        • Books can be downloaded and read or listened to on the student laptop or other device. If the student or parent desire, an individual account can be added.
        • All services are free.
      • The Seeing Eye
        One program for dog guides. This was the first guide dog program, established 1929. It's a good place to start when looking for information.

      Hearing support

      Students who are deaf or hard-of hearing can access auditory information (teacher lectures, questions and answers, etc.) through listening technology. This type of technology includes classroom sound field systems. Listening technology falls under the umbrella of assistive technology, but is managed by the Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing specialists.

      Studying, Learning and Organizing support

      Assistive Technology tools that support studying, learning and organizing include electronic graphic organizers, visual schedules, digital worksheet completion, digital highlighting tools and digital task lists and calendars.

      Tools

      • Picture schedules
      • Post-it notes
      • Highlighter tape
      • PDA
      • Outlining/organizing programs
      • Handheld recorders
        • Visual timers
        • Calendars
        • File organization systems
        • OneNote
        • To-do lists

          Resources

          Free resources from Understood.org

          • Quizlet is a study tool that lets students create electronic flashcards. It offers features that are especially helpful for kids who have trouble reading. The flashcards can include images and audio recordings. They can also be read aloud with TTS. Quizlet also offers activities and games to help with studying and syncs to a mobile app.
          • MindMeister is a digital graphic organizer. Students can use it to organize ideas with visual mind maps, diagrams and pictures. It also helps with taking notes, outlining main ideas in a book or getting started writing an essay. The tool comes built-in templates, but students can also create their own diagrams. In the free version of MindMeister, students can work on three projects at a time.


          Tools to help read or create PDFs

          • Upad for iPad
          • Snaptype for iPad
          • OfficeLens


          Graphic Organizers

          Software

          Read Write 12

          Read&Write logo: purple puzzle piece that says "rw"

          Read Write 12 is a floating toolbar that offers student support in a variety of applications and software, such as Word, OneNote and Internet Explorer. Its features include:

          • Word prediction
          • Text-to-speech
          • Screen masking
          • PDF reader
          • Dictionary/picture dictionary
          • Highlight tools that collect information
          • Vocabulary list builder

          Read Write 12 works best with Microsoft Word, PDFs and Internet Explorer. For more tips and tricks, please reference the links below:

          • Read Write 12 Support
          • Read Write Quick Reference Card
          • Texthelp Toolmatcher
            • Use this toolmatcher to narrow down which Read Write tools can best meet your needs
          • How to access:
            • Application is on the desktop of district devices
            • The software is installed on all secondary student devices automatically. It will be in the students' list of available programs.
            • It is available to all elementary students, teachers and specialists for download from the Software Center.

          Computer Access support

          The LWSD Assistive Technology team works with special education teachers, occupational therapists and physical therapists. Together, they make sure students have access to all educational tools and environments, including computers.

          Support for computer access may include:

          • Computer-adapted keyboard or mouse
            • Keyguard
            • Mini mouse
            • Touch screen
            • Trackball
            • Alternate keyboard
          • Switch access/interface
          • Mobility tools/alternate computer access
          • Support for reading and writing
            • Speech-to-text software
            • Text-to-speech software
            • Picture software

          Mobility support

          The Assistive Technology team collaborates with PTs and OTs to provide mounting systems for communication devices, environmental controls, switch access for toys or appliances or alternate access tools.

          Work with the physical therapist (PT) on your IEP team for access to gait trainers, walkers, standers, wheelchairs and other tools for mobility.

          Work with your occupational therapist (OT) for adaptive eating utensils, personal hygiene tools and adaptive cooking devices.

          Assistive Technology mobility support might include tools to help with the following:

          • Seating/positioning
            • Examples include an adapted/alternate chair, sidelyer, stander, or custom-fitted wheelchair or insert
          • Slip prevention
            • Examples include non-slip surface on chairs, bolster, rolled towel, and/or blocks for feet
          • Adapted eating and drinking utensils
          • Adapted personal hygiene tools
          • Switch-operated cooking devices
            • Examples include devices to help with pouring, blending, etc.
          • Switch-adapted toys
          • Environmental control units
          • Adapted swings
          • Adapted tricycle