Old Redmond Schoolhouse

Block 7: Occupied

 

Welcome to the Early Learning Center at Old Redmond Schoolhouse

Project Updates

In April 2019, voters approved a capital construction levy that is providing $120 million in funding, collected over six years. These funds, combined with state construction assistance funds, will provide a total of $144 million. As of March 2021, $73 million has been spent on these levy projects:

2 aging schools

After more than a year of work, the LWSD Facilities Advisory Committee (FAC) addressed the Board on January 25 during its regular meeting. The FAC was tasked with making recommendations to accommodate the District’s rapid enrollment growth and continue to provide quality learning environments. The Board will use the recommendations to determine next steps, which could include sending a funding measure to voters in 2022.
 
You can see the final recommendations report and the FAC’s presentation to the Board here:

Building on Success: Year in Review 2020

School openings looked a little different in 2020. Grand Opening celebrations with students have been postponed, but Lake Washington School District staff and students with special needs are enjoying their new spaces for teaching and learning. Enjoy these images from our new schools and construction projects.

Program Revenues and Program Expenditures

We are so pleased that all our bond projects are now completed and ready for students. We want to thank the community for their continued support in building needed classroom space. While spending will still occur over the next year as we close out the projects, the charts below show planned 2016 bond program revenues and expenditures compared to current receipts and spending. Of the total planned revenues and expenditures of $434 million has been received to date. Of the total planned revenues and expenditures of $434 million that has been received to date, the district has spent $409 million.

ORSH Preschool

Staff cheered on September 14 as the first preschool student walked confidently into the Early Learning Center at Old Redmond Schoolhouse. It is the first time in more than 20 years that Lake Washington School District has held classes in the building. After a remodel, approved by voters in 2016, the 98-year-old historic building...

Progress Photos

 

Drawings and Site Plans

 

Project Information

Front entrance of the Old Redmond School House

The Old Redmond Schoolhouse, which opened in 1922, is located on the Redmond Elementary Campus. The building, which previously served as an elementary school, has been leased to the City of Redmond since 1997 and is used as a community center.

The Long-Term Facilities Task Force recommended the district reacquire the school and make renovations so that it can be used for preschool classrooms. The old school can’t be used for K-12 classrooms, as the district previously received state funding to replace the building when the new Redmond Elementary project was completed.

Architect: McGranahan Architects
Contractor: Lydig Construction
Location: 16600 NE 80th St, Redmond
Square Footage: 40,000
Spaces: 10 preschool classrooms, gymnasium, cafeteria/commons
Estimated Project Cost: $7,837,000 (Includes construction costs of $4.8 million 2016 dollars, $2.3 million in non-construction costs, and $.7 million in expected construction inflation)
Planned opening: 2020

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Building Condition/Current Situation
The district preschool programs include serving student ages 3 to 5 years old that qualify for Special Education. Students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also served in Head Start and Ready Start programs. Additional preschool spots are made available for a fee on a space available basis. These programs are currently being offered in some elementary schools. They serve students from several neighboring elementary school boundaries.

Upgrading the Old Redmond Schoolhouse facility and using it for preschool classrooms would free up classrooms now used to house preschool at elementary schools. Those classrooms would be able to accommodate additional elementary students.