News

Saidhruv Chittamuri & Paige Stime-perfect ACT scores

A student from Redmond High School (RHS) and another from Nikola Tesla STEM High School have achieved something that less than one-half of 1% of test takers achieve. Saidhruv Chittamuri, senior at RHS, and Paige Stime, senior at Tesla STEM, earned the highest possible ACT composite score of 36.

A group of freshman from Nikola Tesla STEM High School is helping kids with Cerebral Palsy move around a little easier. As part of their end of year project, this team partnered with a program by the name of Go Baby Go

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Dozens of LWSD students earned their way to the 2021 International Career Development Conference (ICDC), which was held virtually in late April and early May. Of that group, about 30 students competed as finalists and two students placed as high as third.

Events

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    Hands-on learning in new LWHS classroom addition


    Why is slime stretchy? How do chickens flap their wings? 

    With these questions in mind, two science classes at Lake Washington High School celebrated the last week of school by setting up lab experiments. The labs also gave students a chance to use the new equipment in two of the school’s 20 new classrooms. The new addition — funded by the 2019 capital construction levy — opened in the fall and is now known as the North Wing.

    In Andrea Thody’s chemistry class, students learned about polymers and borate ions while they made slime in a cup. They stretched, squeezed and bounced the slime before putting it in a plastic bag, washing their hands and helping to tidy the classroom for summer school.

    Next door in biology, J. Ryan Palmer and his students were dissecting chicken wings to learn how muscles, tendons and bones interact in the body. Students flexed and extended the muscles and tendons in the wing to make it move back and forth. A camera focused on the dissection allowed virtual students to follow along with their chicken wings at home. As they finished the lab, Mr. Palmer explained the cleanup process, which was written on the whiteboard-covered cupboards.