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Current Bidding Opportunities

Thank you for your interest in doing business with the Lake Washington School District. If bid opportunities are available they will be listed below.

Kindergarten class of STAR 101.5 Teacher of the Week, Jennifer Kuehnle.Alcott Elementary School teacher Jennifer Kuehnle and her kindergarten class were surprised by STAR 101.5 and the Washington State Dairy Ambassador on October 12. The students were treated to chocolate milk and cheese sticks because Kuehnle was the recipient of the STAR 101.5 Elementary Teacher of the Week award. She was nominated by her student, Emerson Cousens. Emerson’s mom, Paige Cousens, said Emerson likes Mrs. Kuehnle because she is nice and funny.

Each student received a goody bag from Dairy Farmers of Washington, Living Computers: Museum + Labs, KOMO 4, and STAR 101.5. Kuehnle received a personalized plaque from Trophies2Go, a Living Computers: Museum + Labs gift card, and a $100 gift card from Daniel’s Broiler.

Dickinson fourth grade students learn from an employee of the Issaquah Salmon HatcheryFourth grade students at Dickinson Elementary School are learning about the life cycles of salmon. The 90 students saw coho and Chinook salmon up close during a visit to the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery on October 6. The salmon complete their grueling journey from the sea to spawn in Issaquah Creek in the fall. During a tour and scavenger hunt, they learned about salmon habitat and how the hatchery operates.

Dad and daughter read while enjoying doughnuts and fruit.Have you thought about finding time in the morning to read with your child? About 100 students brought a parent or grandparent with them to John Muir Elementary School on the morning of October 6. Families stopped by the library before school to pick out free donated books and read together. Doughnuts and fruit were also provided.

Teacher-librarian Tim Platt started the Parents and Pastries tradition six years ago. He invites families to come read before school three times a year. Muir families donate the new and gently used books.

One boys drinks cocoa while another eats a doughnut after walking to schoolSeveral schools in Lake Washington School District participated in Walk to School Day with activities throughout the week.

On Tuesday, the Rose Hill Elementary PTSA greeted students and families who walked and biked to school. Walk to School Day participants enjoyed hot cocoa and doughnuts outside the school’s main entrance. A raccoon, the school’s mascot, and Ped the Safety Bee mascot high-fived walkers and bikers and took photos. Students also created a walking map by placing a pushpin at the location of where their morning walks began.

A student and her dad take a photo with Blitz the SeahawkAt Einstein Elementary School on Wednesday, Blitz the Seahawk posed for photos and gave high-fives to arriving students. The City of Redmond and PTSA volunteers handed out blinking safety lights. Redmond Chief of Police Kristi Wilson greeted students and answered questions about what it’s like to be a police officer.

Three Bell Elementar students walk to school with their dadBell Elementary School has had activities for students all week. One activity was Walk to School Week Bingo. Participants could look for common items like fire hydrants and crossing signs. Walkers and bikers also earned a necklace charm each day they participated.

Redmond Elementary teachers give out safety blinkersRedmond Elementary School is participating in the SchoolPool program during the month of October. Students keep track of their non-drive trips (walk, bike, bus or carpool) to earn money for the school’s PTSA and a reward for the students. The program is organized by the City of Redmond. Teachers kicked off the program on Wednesday by handing out safety blinkers to participating students. The school has earned the full SchoolPool grant two years in a row and is hoping for a third this year.

Kindergarten student tasts a sour appleDo apples sink or float? Kindergarten students at Rosa Parks Elementary School celebrated Johnny Appleseed’s birthday (Sept. 26) with Apple Week activities and experiments. They peeled and cored apples to make crock pot applesauce and tasted different types of apples.

Legend has it that Johnny Appleseed traveled with a tin pot on his head that he used for cooking. The students enjoyed testing this accessory for themselves.

And the conclusion of students’ sink-or-float experiment? Apples float. So have fun bobbing for apples at your next fall gathering.

Teachers at Rosa Parks Elementary School kicked off their Back to School Assembly by singing “Nothing More” by Alternate Routes. “We are how we treat each other and nothing more,” they sang. PE teacher Caroline Towles, librarian Jim Anderson and fifth-grade teacher Miguel Viamonte played guitar. Music teacher Megan Anderson played the drums.

Two first grade boys build the tallest structure they can out of plastic cups.Cups aren’t just something you drink out of. First grade students in Mead Elementary School’s STEM program used cups and craft sticks to build the tallest structures they could. Then, teacher Jaclyn Donald added constraints to the team-building activity: She challenged students to make the tallest structures they could with the fewest number of cups. Next, she asked them to use only 25 cups without other materials. Donald said the activity teaches students engineering and math skills while they are counting, measuring and comparing numbers. The students also focused on vocabulary words: challenge, constraint, greater than and less than.

During the weekend of September 22-24th, Molly Moon’s Ice Cream in Redmond will sell the Chewy Chocolate Cookie Sundae, an ice cream sundae designed by Mark Twain Elementary School’s 2016-17 3rd grade students! Last year, Twain 3rd graders wrote opinion essays describing the perfect ice cream sundae. The students mailed their essays to the Redmond Molly Moon’s ice cream store. Molly Moon herself read each of the students’ essays and loved them so much that she decided to create and sell one of the sundaes in her Redmond store.

John Muir Elementary students and families were all smiles celebrating the start of the new school year! At the annual PTSA Welcome Back Social on September 7, students and families enjoyed seeing old friends and meeting new classmates. They dined on Food Truck fare, including Sweet and Savory Crepes and BBQ sandwiches. The PTSA donated ice cream bars for all.

During the Welcome Back Social, Kirkland mayor Amy Walen visited with the community. The Boy Scouts hosted a “build your own paper rocket” booth, complete with a foot stomping launcher. Muir’s Watch Dogs (dads, grandpas, uncles, and other father figures who volunteer in a variety of school activities assigned by the principal) attended the event. And, Muir’s Natural Leaders were on hand to provide support to non-English speaking families.

 

All Lake Washington School District students have the right to public education. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Plyler vs. Doe (457 U.S. 202 (1982)) that undocumented children and young adults have the same right to attend public primary and secondary schools as do U.S. citizens and permanent residents. Lake Washington does not ask for or collect immigration status information.

Lake Washington remains committed to serving all students and providing educational opportunities for all. We will continue to uphold the U.S. Supreme Court ruling and serve all students, regardless of their status.

We understand that families and students are concerned by the uncertainty of the recent DACA announcement. Lake Washington cares deeply about all our students and families and remains committed to helping all students feel safe and welcome at school and achieve academic success. We also remain hopeful that Congress will work together to reach a bipartisan resolution on issues related to DACA.

Our state’s public education system exists to help all students learn. This foundational concept is clearly stated in Article IX, Section I of our state constitution:

“It is the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all children residing within its borders, without distinction or preference on account of race, color, caste, or sex.”

Our staff remains committed to supporting every child’s emotional well-being, and we will do everything in our power to ensure that all students feel safe and welcomed at school.

 

Welcome back! Enjoy the video below from the first day of school at McAuliffe Elementary. Staff were excited to welcome students and parents back for the 2017-18 school year. Pictures from the first day of school at Rose Hill Elementary and Franklin Elementary are available on the LWSD Facebook page.

Thank you to Community SERVE Day volunteers who took the time to volunteer at three elementary schools on Aug. 20: Helen Keller, Henry David Thoreau and Norman Rockwell.

About 300 volunteers from PTAs, school communities, and local faith communities spent the day helping the three schools get ready for the first day of school. They spread bark around play areas, painted U.S. maps on playgrounds, planted flowerbeds, and helped teachers set up classrooms.

The Northshore Community Church organizes the event in partnership with the Lake Washington and Northshore school districts. The annual day of service draws more than 2,400 volunteers to 24 schools in Bothell, Kenmore, Kirkland, Redmond and Woodinville to help prepare for the school year.

 

Rose Hill Elementary created a fun new way to help students practice and remember their multiplication tables. PTSA volunteers decorated the elementary school stairs with decals of multiplication equations. When students return to school on September 5, they will learn and practice math while walking through the hallways.

What happens when you take an ordinary wood chair and ask a classroom of students to show their class’ culture by decorating the chair? Imaginations run wild! Students at Alcott Elementary took a different approach to this year’s International Culture Night in May. Each classroom decorated a wooden chair to represent their classroom. Each chair was then included in a “Parade of Chairs.” Community members purchased the chairs and some chairs had bidders until the very last second. The PTSA raised over $2,000 for their school. “We chose to add the parade of chairs to the mix this year because we wanted to promote our class spirit and class culture as a whole among the students,” said Shannon Kershaw, family event coordinator for Alcott Elementary PTSA.

Pending Cooperative Bids and Proposals

Public agencies in the State of Washington are authorized by RCW 28A.320 and RCW 39.34 to enter into cooperative agreements for the purchase of various equipment, supplies and services. Below are the pending bids and proposals that, once awarded, may be accessed by other public agencies. If bid opportunities or proposals are available they will be listed below.

Kindergarten class of STAR 101.5 Teacher of the Week, Jennifer Kuehnle.Alcott Elementary School teacher Jennifer Kuehnle and her kindergarten class were surprised by STAR 101.5 and the Washington State Dairy Ambassador on October 12. The students were treated to chocolate milk and cheese sticks because Kuehnle was the recipient of the STAR 101.5 Elementary Teacher of the Week award. She was nominated by her student, Emerson Cousens. Emerson’s mom, Paige Cousens, said Emerson likes Mrs. Kuehnle because she is nice and funny.

Each student received a goody bag from Dairy Farmers of Washington, Living Computers: Museum + Labs, KOMO 4, and STAR 101.5. Kuehnle received a personalized plaque from Trophies2Go, a Living Computers: Museum + Labs gift card, and a $100 gift card from Daniel’s Broiler.

Dickinson fourth grade students learn from an employee of the Issaquah Salmon HatcheryFourth grade students at Dickinson Elementary School are learning about the life cycles of salmon. The 90 students saw coho and Chinook salmon up close during a visit to the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery on October 6. The salmon complete their grueling journey from the sea to spawn in Issaquah Creek in the fall. During a tour and scavenger hunt, they learned about salmon habitat and how the hatchery operates.

Dad and daughter read while enjoying doughnuts and fruit.Have you thought about finding time in the morning to read with your child? About 100 students brought a parent or grandparent with them to John Muir Elementary School on the morning of October 6. Families stopped by the library before school to pick out free donated books and read together. Doughnuts and fruit were also provided.

Teacher-librarian Tim Platt started the Parents and Pastries tradition six years ago. He invites families to come read before school three times a year. Muir families donate the new and gently used books.

One boys drinks cocoa while another eats a doughnut after walking to schoolSeveral schools in Lake Washington School District participated in Walk to School Day with activities throughout the week.

On Tuesday, the Rose Hill Elementary PTSA greeted students and families who walked and biked to school. Walk to School Day participants enjoyed hot cocoa and doughnuts outside the school’s main entrance. A raccoon, the school’s mascot, and Ped the Safety Bee mascot high-fived walkers and bikers and took photos. Students also created a walking map by placing a pushpin at the location of where their morning walks began.

A student and her dad take a photo with Blitz the SeahawkAt Einstein Elementary School on Wednesday, Blitz the Seahawk posed for photos and gave high-fives to arriving students. The City of Redmond and PTSA volunteers handed out blinking safety lights. Redmond Chief of Police Kristi Wilson greeted students and answered questions about what it’s like to be a police officer.

Three Bell Elementar students walk to school with their dadBell Elementary School has had activities for students all week. One activity was Walk to School Week Bingo. Participants could look for common items like fire hydrants and crossing signs. Walkers and bikers also earned a necklace charm each day they participated.

Redmond Elementary teachers give out safety blinkersRedmond Elementary School is participating in the SchoolPool program during the month of October. Students keep track of their non-drive trips (walk, bike, bus or carpool) to earn money for the school’s PTSA and a reward for the students. The program is organized by the City of Redmond. Teachers kicked off the program on Wednesday by handing out safety blinkers to participating students. The school has earned the full SchoolPool grant two years in a row and is hoping for a third this year.

Kindergarten student tasts a sour appleDo apples sink or float? Kindergarten students at Rosa Parks Elementary School celebrated Johnny Appleseed’s birthday (Sept. 26) with Apple Week activities and experiments. They peeled and cored apples to make crock pot applesauce and tasted different types of apples.

Legend has it that Johnny Appleseed traveled with a tin pot on his head that he used for cooking. The students enjoyed testing this accessory for themselves.

And the conclusion of students’ sink-or-float experiment? Apples float. So have fun bobbing for apples at your next fall gathering.

Teachers at Rosa Parks Elementary School kicked off their Back to School Assembly by singing “Nothing More” by Alternate Routes. “We are how we treat each other and nothing more,” they sang. PE teacher Caroline Towles, librarian Jim Anderson and fifth-grade teacher Miguel Viamonte played guitar. Music teacher Megan Anderson played the drums.

Two first grade boys build the tallest structure they can out of plastic cups.Cups aren’t just something you drink out of. First grade students in Mead Elementary School’s STEM program used cups and craft sticks to build the tallest structures they could. Then, teacher Jaclyn Donald added constraints to the team-building activity: She challenged students to make the tallest structures they could with the fewest number of cups. Next, she asked them to use only 25 cups without other materials. Donald said the activity teaches students engineering and math skills while they are counting, measuring and comparing numbers. The students also focused on vocabulary words: challenge, constraint, greater than and less than.

During the weekend of September 22-24th, Molly Moon’s Ice Cream in Redmond will sell the Chewy Chocolate Cookie Sundae, an ice cream sundae designed by Mark Twain Elementary School’s 2016-17 3rd grade students! Last year, Twain 3rd graders wrote opinion essays describing the perfect ice cream sundae. The students mailed their essays to the Redmond Molly Moon’s ice cream store. Molly Moon herself read each of the students’ essays and loved them so much that she decided to create and sell one of the sundaes in her Redmond store.

John Muir Elementary students and families were all smiles celebrating the start of the new school year! At the annual PTSA Welcome Back Social on September 7, students and families enjoyed seeing old friends and meeting new classmates. They dined on Food Truck fare, including Sweet and Savory Crepes and BBQ sandwiches. The PTSA donated ice cream bars for all.

During the Welcome Back Social, Kirkland mayor Amy Walen visited with the community. The Boy Scouts hosted a “build your own paper rocket” booth, complete with a foot stomping launcher. Muir’s Watch Dogs (dads, grandpas, uncles, and other father figures who volunteer in a variety of school activities assigned by the principal) attended the event. And, Muir’s Natural Leaders were on hand to provide support to non-English speaking families.

 

All Lake Washington School District students have the right to public education. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Plyler vs. Doe (457 U.S. 202 (1982)) that undocumented children and young adults have the same right to attend public primary and secondary schools as do U.S. citizens and permanent residents. Lake Washington does not ask for or collect immigration status information.

Lake Washington remains committed to serving all students and providing educational opportunities for all. We will continue to uphold the U.S. Supreme Court ruling and serve all students, regardless of their status.

We understand that families and students are concerned by the uncertainty of the recent DACA announcement. Lake Washington cares deeply about all our students and families and remains committed to helping all students feel safe and welcome at school and achieve academic success. We also remain hopeful that Congress will work together to reach a bipartisan resolution on issues related to DACA.

Our state’s public education system exists to help all students learn. This foundational concept is clearly stated in Article IX, Section I of our state constitution:

“It is the paramount duty of the state to make ample provision for the education of all children residing within its borders, without distinction or preference on account of race, color, caste, or sex.”

Our staff remains committed to supporting every child’s emotional well-being, and we will do everything in our power to ensure that all students feel safe and welcomed at school.

 

Welcome back! Enjoy the video below from the first day of school at McAuliffe Elementary. Staff were excited to welcome students and parents back for the 2017-18 school year. Pictures from the first day of school at Rose Hill Elementary and Franklin Elementary are available on the LWSD Facebook page.

Thank you to Community SERVE Day volunteers who took the time to volunteer at three elementary schools on Aug. 20: Helen Keller, Henry David Thoreau and Norman Rockwell.

About 300 volunteers from PTAs, school communities, and local faith communities spent the day helping the three schools get ready for the first day of school. They spread bark around play areas, painted U.S. maps on playgrounds, planted flowerbeds, and helped teachers set up classrooms.

The Northshore Community Church organizes the event in partnership with the Lake Washington and Northshore school districts. The annual day of service draws more than 2,400 volunteers to 24 schools in Bothell, Kenmore, Kirkland, Redmond and Woodinville to help prepare for the school year.

 

Rose Hill Elementary created a fun new way to help students practice and remember their multiplication tables. PTSA volunteers decorated the elementary school stairs with decals of multiplication equations. When students return to school on September 5, they will learn and practice math while walking through the hallways.

What happens when you take an ordinary wood chair and ask a classroom of students to show their class’ culture by decorating the chair? Imaginations run wild! Students at Alcott Elementary took a different approach to this year’s International Culture Night in May. Each classroom decorated a wooden chair to represent their classroom. Each chair was then included in a “Parade of Chairs.” Community members purchased the chairs and some chairs had bidders until the very last second. The PTSA raised over $2,000 for their school. “We chose to add the parade of chairs to the mix this year because we wanted to promote our class spirit and class culture as a whole among the students,” said Shannon Kershaw, family event coordinator for Alcott Elementary PTSA.