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Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force
​Process to engage the community on planning for school building needs throughout Lake Washington School District

Community Task Force recommends building more schools in Lake Washington School District
November 10, 2015
Redmond, Wash. – After nearly a year of work by the Lake Washington School District (LWSD) Long Term Facilities Task Force, P.S. Reilly, Task Force member and parent, called its recommendations “a reasonable person’s approach to what is a very tough problem.” The tough problem was the issue of classroom capacity and aging schools in a rapidly growing school district. The “reasonable person” represents the collective wisdom of the 63-person community task force as well as the larger community, represented by input collected during the process.

Reilly, a task force member and parent, presented the Task Force’s 254-page report to the Board of Directors at its November 9 meeting. It is the outcome of nearly a year of work by the volunteer Task Force and its Working Subcommittee. Several smaller groups also dug into specific topics, including the efficient use of space in school buildings. Read more.

Task Force Finalizes Recommendations
October 29, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center in Redmond on Thursday, October 29 to finalize their recommendations to the School Board. Topics on the meeting agenda included:

  • School Board comments and suggestions
  • Report – areas of agreement
  • Report – areas that need more discussion and/or revision
  • School Board additional requests to Task Force
  • Planning for presentation of final recommendations to the School Board

A detailed summary of the October 29 meeting is available here.

Task Force Reviews Community Feedback on Draft Recommendations
October 21, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met on Wednesday, October 14, at Lake Washington High School to continue reviewing community feedback on their draft recommendations. Topics on the meeting agenda included:

  • Review community feedback results
  • Address and propose revisions to recommended projects list
  • Compile revisions to the draft recommendations and Recommendations Report
  • Plan for the School Board study session on October 26

The Task Force continued their discussion from the previous week regarding key pieces of community feedback they heard. Task Force members received community feedback in a number of ways. Those ways included Learning Community meetings, presentations at PTSA meetings, Curriculum Nights, other community venues, and an online survey via the online open house. They reviewed last week’s list of key takeaways, added several more, and then continued sorting them into actionable categories. They worked through how to revise the recommendations based on these key takeaways.

At the end of the meeting, the Task Force divided up the three main action items: revising the projects list, writing additional background narrative for the recommendations, and editing the full Recommendations Report. The Task Force looks forward to their study session with the School Board on October 26, when they can review their recommendations with the School Board and receive feedback. Following that meeting, the Task Force will meet on October 29 to finalize their recommendations. On November 9, the Task Force will present their final recommendations and report to the School Board.

Finally, the Task Force would like to thank everyone in the Lake Washington School District community for their in-person and online feedback. It was invaluable in shaping their revisions to their recommendations to the School Board. To view community feedback, visit the online open house’s Feedback page.

A detailed summary of the October 14 meeting is available here.

Task Force Hosts Town Hall for Community Input; Reviews Feedback
October 14, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force hosted a Town Hall on October 7. The Task Force had two goals for the Town Hall. First, inform community members of the district’s long-term facilities challenges (lack of classroom capacity and aging schools). Second, provide an open forum for Task Force and community members to discuss the Task Force’s draft recommendations for addressing the needs. The Town Hall included:

  • Open house where stakeholders and community members could learn about the facilities challenges facing the district
  • Video explaining the Task Force’s recommendations
  • Discussion area for community and Task Force members to answer questions and engage in dialogue
  • Formal Town Hall session in which Task Force members and district staff answered questions from the audience

The following evening, on October 8, the Task Force met to discuss the Town Hall and community feedback to date on their draft recommendations to the School Board. Task Force members reviewed their outreach efforts, including Learning Community meetings and presentations at PTSA meetings, Curriculum Nights, and other community venues. The Task Force compiled key pieces of community feedback they’ve heard so far. They discussed how to revise their recommendations based on community feedback, and how they could better explain the Task Force process and recommendations to the community.

Materials from October 7 Town Hall

Materials from October 8 Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force Meeting

School Facilities Task Force Develops Recommendations, Asks for Input
September 3, 2015
Redmond, Wash. – Over the last few years, Lake Washington School District’s enrollment has been growing by the equivalent of an elementary school each year. District wide, enrollment is estimated to increase to more than 30,000 students by 2021-22. That is over 5,000 more students than district schools were built to serve. There is little space left in current school buildings, some of which need replacing due to their age and building conditions. What should Lake Washington School District do?

That was the challenge that faced the Long-Term Facilities Task Force as it began its work last December. A smaller Working Subcommittee of the Task Force dug into the details of the district’s overall needs, use of space, funding for school buildings, ways to reduce costs and other issues. The Task Force also reached out to the broader community through surveys and open houses for input on their work.

They have now developed a set of draft recommendations and are asking for feedback from the community. The recommendations address classroom capacity issues, cost reduction, efficient use of space, and other issues. They also recommend specific projects to be undertaken in the future. Some of the major recommendations concerned capacity, aging facilities and funding.

An online open house provides information on all of the draft recommendations. A survey on that site is open through October 11. Community members can also participate in in-person Learning Community meetings in September, as well as in a Task Force Town Hall on Wednesday, October 7, at Rose Hill Middle School from 6-8:30 p.m. Read more, including the list of recommendations.

 

Task Force refines, completes draft recommendations
July 30, 2015
The 
Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center in Redmond on Monday, July 27, to continue developing their draft recommendations. Topics on the meeting agenda included:

  • Recap of the July 18 workshop
  • The Task Force’s recommended level of investment
  • Continued recommendations development, including use of space and design principles
  • Planning for the August 3 School Board meeting

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, began the meeting with a recap of the July 18 recommendations workshop. She explained the process of developing draft recommendations at this workshop, and the Task Force members that also attended the workshop clarified a few discussion points. The Task Force then reviewed and validated the recommendations developed at the workshop. They discussed a few edits and additions to the recommendations on the following topics: enrollment projections, aging facilities, strategies before building, proposed projects, changing conditions, funding, and siting.

Forrest Miller, Director of Support Services, presented proposed design principles to inform the lowest and mid-range capital investment resource levels. These principles will be used to reduce cost for the mid-range investment level without reducing cost/quality per square foot or square footage per student, as would be required by the lowest investment level. The Task Force decided to recommend a mid-range investment with these design savings methods incorporated where feasible.

Penny and PS Reilly, Task Force member, reviewed the recommendations for efficient use of space. The Task Force will recommend revising the Standard of Service to remove dedicated computer lab space from elementary schools, development and testing of a methodology to calculate resource room requirements, and an annual or bi-annual audit of how all building spaces are used in the district. The Task Force had a few additional edits to the recommendations, and then approved the draft.

Penny reminded the group of the presentation to the School Board on August 3, and asked for volunteers to attend, answer questions, and/or present the draft recommendations. She noted an upcoming online open house, Task Force and Town Hall Meeting on September 9, and then the presentation of final recommendations to the School Board on September 14.

A detailed summary of the July 27 meeting is available here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. After the Task Force presents their draft recommendations at the August 3 School Board meeting, an online open house will ask the community to provide feedback on the draft recommendations. A Task Force and Town Hall Meeting will be held on September 9 before the recommendations are finalized for the September 14 School Board meeting.

 

Task Force develops draft recommendations
July 30, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center in Redmond on Saturday, July 18, for a recommendations development workshop. Topics on the workshop agenda included:

  • Learning about the outcomes of the 2015 legislative session and implications for district facilities.
  • Learning about the District’s plans for next steps for Task Force recommendations, including future bond advisory committees.
  • Recommendations development, including aging facilities, enrollment, siting criteria, use of space, and strategies and projects by scenario.

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, began the workshop with an overview of the day’s agenda and decisions to be made. Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, gave the Task Force an update on this year’s legislative outcomes, which included fully funded All-Day Kindergarten for 2016-18, partially funding the McCleary reduced class size for grades K-3, $200 million for a state-wide K-3 class size reduction construction pilot program, and a small increase to the School Construction Assistance Program’s Construction Cost Allowance.

Penny summarized the Task Force’s June 24 recommendations of a New Schools approach at a low-to-mid capital investment level for the current need scenario. In addition, the Task Force had recommended prioritizing modernization of aging facilities that also add capacity. She then led the Task Force in small group activities to discuss which strategies to use to reduce the need to build new schools, along with changing conditions scenarios.

The Task Force recommended that before determining the need for new schools, the district should pursue the following strategies to provide additional classroom space in existing schools (in no particular order): rent or lease space for preschool classes; take back and use the Old Redmond Schoolhouse for preschool classes; offer double-shifting at Choice middle and high schools; and build additions where possible as needed. The district updated the need scenarios based on the Task Force’s recommended strategies. The Task Force then discussed specific school projects by learning community to meet the classroom space needs based on the current and McCleary need scenarios.

While not its preferred strategy, the Task Force recommended that if the district does not secure the necessary funds to implement their new school recommendations, the district should use the year-round multi-track schedule as a strategy to address lack of classroom capacity. The Task Force also provided recommended strategies for the district to consider using if enrollment increases and/or if the district cannot raise the full amount of funding to implement the Task Force’s recommendations.

The Task Force also confirmed or developed recommendations for enrollment, funding, school siting criteria, and aging facilities assessments and reporting. 

View a detailed summary of the July 18 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. After a follow-up meeting on July 27, the Task Force will present their draft recommendations to the School Board in early August. Another online open house will ask the community to provide feedback on the recommendations before they are finalized for the School Board in September.

 

Task force reviews community feedback, begins recommendation development
July 7, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center in Redmond on June 24. Topics on the meeting agenda included:

  • Overview of work to date and community input 
  • Recent community feedback and the Use of Space subgroup’s findings
  • Recommendations development, including approach, resource level, and aging facilities

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, began the meeting with an overview of the Task Force’s work to date and community feedback. Topics of review included: Task Force scope, overall need, how to meet the need, scope and quality of construction, funding, the framework, values, needs scenarios, use of classroom space, and recommendation format and outline.

Penny summarized the most recent community feedback and the research done by the Use of Space subgroup. The Task Force discussed in detail the efficient use of classroom space issues. Those issues included updating the Standard of Service, current use of space in the district, and developing a methodology for the district to provide and track classroom space. The Task Force will recommend that the district work to develop a methodology to develop planning levels for required program spaces. They will also recommend the district conduct regular audits or reviews of use of classroom, required program and specialized spaces. They will recommend the district use the results of the reviews to compare actual use to planned use and make adjustments as needed. The Task Force will also recommend these results be clearly communicated to the community to demonstrate accountability.

The Task Force began to develop their long-term facilities planning recommendations with a discussion of the recommended resource level for the current needs scenario. They divided into small groups to talk about whether they agreed with the community feedback. The community survey results recommended the mid-range capital investment level. After reconvening, the Task Force decided to recommend that the district use the build new schools approach, at a low- to mid-range resource level when planning for the current needs scenario. The Task Force also decided to recommend that the district address aging facilities by modernizing aging schools that also would add capacity. However, they also emphasized the importance of equity when deciding which schools to modernize so that no learning community is disadvantaged by this approach. 

View a detailed summary of the June 24 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. After a recommendations workshop in July, the Task Force will present their draft recommendations to the School Board in early August. Another online open house will ask the community to provide feedback on the recommendations before they are finalized for the School Board in September.

 

Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force hosts open house for community
June 16, 2015
The Lake Washington School District hosted an open house on June 9 for its long-term facilities planning process. Boards and handouts provided guests with information on the following topics:

  • The district’s capacity and aging facilities needs, including enrollment and capacity projections
  • The long-term facilities planning Task Force: their purpose, goals, and values, as well as the information they’ve studied thus far
  • The planning approach and completed framework
  • Capacity needs scenarios
  • Task Force next steps

Task Force members and district staff explained the boards to guests and addressed their questions. Visitors were specifically directed to a station that framed questions the Task Force wants community input on. These questions focused on the different strategies the Task Force is considering. Most strategies would address the lack of classroom capacity, some would address aging facilities, and some would do both. Some require capital investments (money spent on buildings and furnishings). Others would instead require additional operating fund (money spent on day-to-day operations, including salaries, heating, lunches, transportation, etc.). Guests were able to submit their feedback via an online or paper survey at the open house. The Task Force will be developing their long-term facilities planning recommendations for the district over the summer. The community’s insight will help inform their recommendations. The Task Force will take additional feedback on draft recommendations in the fall.

Copies of the Open House guide and boards can be found here. Those who did not attend the community meeting can still provide their feedback to the Task Force via an online open house found here. Task Force meeting materials are available on this webpage. The next Task Force meeting is on June 24 at Lake Washington High School. As always, community members are welcome to observe the meeting.

 

Task Force discusses shared values with the community
June 15, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Rose Hill Middle School on June 3. Topics on the meeting agenda included:

  • Emerging issues, including a space audit request and the revised building Standard of Service strategy
  • Working session with the community on the Task Force’s shared and additional values
  • Needs scenarios discussion and recommendation
  • Review of strategy one-pager descriptions and resource level tradeoffs

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, began the meeting with a discussion on a couple of emerging issues in the Task Force. First, she addressed the request for a space audit of classroom facilities in the district. She asked a few prompting questions, including how a space audit would affect the Task Force’s recommendations, and the feasibility and specifics of a space audit. Task Force members discussed the benefits and challenges of a space audit, and concluded that better data about how the district is currently using space could be an important part of their final recommendations to the district. Second, Penny addressed the revised building standard of service strategy. She shared that since work on defining the reduced level of service is still ongoing this issue will be treated as a strategy rather than a needs scenario. The Efficient Use of Space group will continue to look at this issue at their upcoming meeting.

The Task Force and community members engaged in a working session on the values the Task Force will use to evaluate their recommendations to the district. Survey results from almost 700 community members were shared with the Task Force. Breaking into six small groups, each group reviewed the community’s input on the shared and additional values that came out of the previous meeting and discussed their thoughts. When the full group reconvened, each group shared their results and the Task Force came to a consensus on the shared values with a few revisions.

Penny led a discussion on the three capacity needs scenarios that will guide the Task Force’s recommendations: current capacity level, the McCleary decision, and Initiative 1351. McCleary and Initiative 1351 both reduce the number of students in a classroom, thus affecting how much overall classroom capacity is needed. Penny and Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, summarized the requirements of each scenario. Penny asked Task Force members to share their thoughts on which scenario the district should plan for. Through their discussions, the Task Force decided not to select one needs scenario for their recommendations. Some members suggested the district be prepared for any of the three scenarios to unfold.

Penny wrapped up the meeting with a few more items to discuss. First, she introduced the tradeoff descriptions for each resource level in the framework. She asked the Task Force to review the descriptions and send their thoughts to her by the end of the week. Penny noted upcoming events, including an updated online open house, the in-person open house on June 9, the small group meeting on June 5, and a potential Task Force full-day working session in July. She asked for Task Force comments on the next online open house survey and the strategy description one-pagers.

View a detailed summary of the June 3 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. There is a Community Open House on Tuesday, June 9, at 6:30 pm at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center. The next Task Force meeting is on June 24 at Lake Washington High School.

 

LWSD Facilities Planning Task Force seeks input on strategies and resource levels
June 9, 2015
Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force is asking the community for input on specific strategies and resource levels the district should use in its facilities planning. It has been working since December to find ways to address the district’s aging school facilities and its need for classroom space to serve a rapidly growing population.

Input is being gathered through an online open house June 9 to June 21. A survey on the open house site will be open through midnight on June 21. Read more.

 

Task Force discusses values and evaluation
June 1, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Lake Washington High School on May 20. Topics on the meeting agenda included:

  • Evaluation discussion
  • Report out on the Working Subcommittee's (WSC) work
  • Framework resource level costs, strategies, tradeoffs, and educational impacts
  • Facilities costs and taxes
  • Elements of Task Force recommendations

Penny Mabie, neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, began the meeting with a discussion of the values the Task Force will use to craft and evaluate their recommendations. The group brainstormed values to consider for recommendations using the prompting question, “We made this recommendation to the district because…” After an energetic discussion, the group decided on several key values to share with the community as the Task Force moves closer to drafting recommendations.

Penny facilitated a discussion for the WSC to report on their recent work to the Task Force. She summarized the major items the WSC has studied to date. She also asked for feedback on the one-page descriptions of each potential strategy the Task Force is considering. Finally, Penny shared the process, outcomes and recommendations from the Use of Space subgroup. The Task Force provided feedback on these recommendations. They approved a recommendation to remove elementary computer labs from future planning guidelines.

Penny led a conversation about the updated framework. The framework now includes resource level costs, initially prioritized strategies and educational impacts. The Task Force gave feedback on the recommendations from the WSC regarding how to further define the Lowest and Highest Capital Investment levels. 

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, introduced the Task Force to need scenarios. She explained how the scenarios fit into the framework as it develops into a draft recommendation template. She talked through the details of the four need scenarios and the cost and capacity implications for each.

To conclude the meeting, Penny reviewed the schedule of upcoming meetings and the plan to extend the Task Force process. Kathryn Reith, Communications Director for the district, spoke about the upcoming communications and outreach methods regarding community involvement in this facilities planning process. Because the meeting ran late, the group did not discuss facilities costs and taxes or elements of Task Force recommendations. They were tasked with reviewing these items for homework.

View a detailed summary of the May 20 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The next Task Force meeting will include a Town Hall Meeting on June 3 at Rose Hill Middle School.

 

LWSD Facilities Planning Task Force seeks input on community values for school facilities
May 27, 2015
Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force has been working since December to find ways to address the district’s aging school facilities and its need for classroom space to serve a rapidly growing population. The Task Force is now asking the community for input on the community values it should use to evaluate potential solutions. Later in June, the Task Force will ask for input on specific strategies.

Input is being gathered on values the Task Force should use to evaluate their recommendations through an online open house May 26 to June 2. A survey on the open house site will be open through midnight on June 2. Read more.

 

WSC learns about building design, construction trade-offs, and educational impacts; reviews current space use and need scenarios
May 18, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center on May 13. The following topics were on the meeting agenda:

  • Report back from Efficient Use of Space subgroup
  • Framework resource level costs, tradeoffs, and educational impacts
  • Framework resource levels and need scenarios
  • Facilities cost and tax implications
  • Elements of Task Force recommendations

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, reported on the work of the small group studying efficient use of space in the district. The group looked at the alignment between the district’s Standard of Service, which determines how much classroom capacity is needed to accommodate projected student enrollment, and actual use of space across the district. They considered how year-to-year use of space affects long-term facilities planning. They reviewed information the district gathered from each school principal about how space is used in their schools. The small group recommended the WSC and Task Force consider a revised Standard of Service for planning purposes. This reduced Standard of Service would maintain the current planning levels for music, art/science, pull-out Quest, and special education self-contained rooms. It would remove computer labs and reduce the planning number used for resource rooms. They also suggested the District continue to monitor actual use and look for trends that might influence changes to the Standard of Service.

To give the WSC additional information on building design and construction, tradeoffs and educational impacts, two guest speakers presented at the meeting. Rebecca Baibak of Integrus Architecture spoke about her experience as an architect on numerous school facilities projects, including Shorecrest HS, Sammamish HS, Rush ES, and Tesla STEM School. She shared information about current trends in education as they influence school design. There is a move toward experiential or “inquiry-based” learning, which requires a variety of learning spaces for different sizes of student-led groups. She explained how new spaces reflect this shift in instructional methods while emphasizing access to daylight and efficient use of resources. Heidi Paul, principal of Bell Elementary School, spoke about her experience as a principal shifting from an older school to a modernized one. She emphasized the importance of availability of a variety of learning spaces in facilitating active, engaged learning for students.

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, presented information on the need scenarios that will be applied to the resource levels framework. She explained four need scenarios – current district need projections, reduced Standard of Service, if the McCleary court decision is implemented, and if Initiative 1351 is implemented in full. Each of these will have different impacts on the district’s classroom capacity needs. These different need scenarios will change how much investment is needed in each of the resource investment levels. She presented the data on how this would work with the strategies in each resource level.

Penny wrapped up the meeting by asking the WSC for feedback on how to define some of the resource levels. For example, how should the district reduce cost in the lowest capital investment level – reduce square footage, reduce cost per square foot, or both? After collecting some feedback on these questions, Penny reminded the group of the Task Force meeting the following week. She also reminded everyone to participate on the Task Force discussion site.

The meeting ran long, so the group did not have time to discuss the last two agenda items – Facilities Costs and Tax Implications and Elements of Task Force Recommendations. Those items will be addressed at the next Task Force meeting.

View a detailed summary of the May 13 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The fourth Task Force meeting will be on Wednesday, May 20, at 6:00 p.m. at Lake Washington High School.

 

Task Force Prioritizes Strategies, Continues Revisions of Planning Framework
May 1, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Rose Hill Middle School on April 29. Topics discussed included:

  • The Working Subcommittee’s (WSC) recent work
  • Working session with community members on prioritizing strategies in the framework
  • Task Force guidance on next steps for the WSC

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, facilitated a discussion about the WSC’s work since the previous Task Force meeting. The Task Force reviewed the updated resource levels framework and the narrated framework video, and then WSC members responded to discussion questions about their recent work. They shared updates about information requests, the WSC’s role in consolidating information into a focused structure, the process behind creating the framework, evaluating capital facilities costs, and issues the WSC is still struggling with. Next, WSC members responded to questions from the Task Force. Questions included: how other districts’ costs compare to LWSD, how site conditions factor into capital costs, survey clarification, how past LWSD facilities projects fit into the updated framework, and an explanation of future-proofing.

Penny shared survey results from the community and from the WSC on how strategies should be prioritized within each resource level of the framework. She then led a working session for Task Force and community members to discuss and prioritize strategies. She divided the Task Force and community members into five groups, each with a few WSC members as leaders. The groups were given some time to work through each resource level, developing their own prioritizations of strategies. Using an online survey, each group’s results were combined and then reviewed by the full Task Force. The group discussed how these results compared to the community and WSC feedback, and then Task Force members clarified some specifics of several strategies.

To conclude the meeting, Penny asked a few more discussion questions of the Task Force. The group shared thoughts on what additional information would be helpful to finalize their prioritization of strategies within each resource level and also shared guidance on what the WSC should focus on in the coming weeks. Penny reviewed the schedule of upcoming meetings, and reminded Task Force members to use their discussion site.

View a detailed summary of the April 29 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The next WSC meeting will be on May 13 at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center. The next Task Force meeting will be on May 20 at Lake Washington High School.

 

Task Force Revises Planning Framework
April 21, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Keller Elementary School on April 15. Before the meeting, WSC members had the opportunity to take a tour of Juanita Elementary School, led by Principal Dana Stairs. After the first tour, Keller Elementary School Principal Sandy Dennehy led a tour of Keller Elementary for WSC and Task Force members. 

After the tour, the WSC met in an art / science classroom and discussed the following topics:

  • Follow-up requests from the previous WSC meeting
  • Introduction to costs associated with strategies in each resource level
  • Discussion of the resource levels framework

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, began the meeting with an update on relevant legislation in Olympia. She presented a summary of a few bills in progress in the state House and Senate, including potential changes to class size requirements, funding for all day kindergarten, and impact fees. Next, Ms. Fogard shared information on follow-up requests from the previous WSC meeting. The main request was for research on the relationship between school size and academic achievement, so Ms. Fogard presented a review of literature discussing this topic. Generally, this research indicated that reducing overcrowding leads to increased academic performance. However, research on exact optimal school size is still inconclusive.

Ms. Fogard presented an introduction to the costs of strategies within each resource level. She described the district’s process for estimating the project costs for various strategies depending on the level of investment. She explained each cost estimate and the background for each calculation, and shared several informational handouts on the details of the costs.

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, led a discussion about a planning framework that was introduced at the previous WSC meeting. The group revised and clarified its organization of the framework, and discussed how to present the framework to the Task Force and the broader community via the online open house. They also reviewed how best to ask for community feedback on the upcoming online survey.

View a detailed summary of the April 15 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The third Task Force meeting will be on Wednesday, April 29, at 6:00 p.m. at Rose Hill Middle School.

 

Working Subcommittee categorizes potential strategies to address lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities
April 8, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Kirk Elementary School on April 1. Kirk Elementary School Principal Monica Garcia led a tour of the school for the WSC and Task Force members.

After the tour, the WSC met in the gym and discussed the following topics:

  • Follow-up requests and outcomes from the second Task Force meeting
  • Costs associated with capital facilities
  • Framework for option packages

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, addressed follow-up requests from the second Task Force meeting. A Task Force member asked how classroom capacity data is obtained, which led to a larger discussion about use of space in schools. Ms. Mabie advised that a smaller group of the WSC will investigate this issue further, and report back to the WSC. Second, she shared enrollment and capacity projections with and without recent reboundary results (reassigning students to different schools to manage short-term overcrowding issues) incorporated. Third, she presented a Task Force overview WSC members can use to update community members on the district’s long-term facilities needs and the work being done by the Task Force. The WSC also discussed policy guidance from the Task Force.

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, presented an overview of cost information associated with capital facilities planning. She outlined different types of construction, building, and project costs, and some factors that go into each type of cost. She put costs in context by showing costs for past district construction projects and other districts’ construction projects. Forrest Miller, Director of Support Services, presented a comparison of two schools designed by the same architect and built by the same contractor at a similar time in different districts to demonstrate how construction costs can differ greatly between schools. Ms. Fogard concluded the construction discussion with a cost comparison between construction of school buildings and office buildings.

Ms. Mabie introduced a planning framework to help the WSC and Task Force consider various strategies according to how much investment might be available. She led an activity and discussion surrounding varying levels of resource “buckets.” The WSC reviewed potential strategies to address lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities, and as a group placed each strategy into resource buckets. The group brainstormed cost / benefit trade-offs – such as durability, educational impact, and aesthetics – and reviewed how to use this framework moving forward.

View a detailed summary of the April 1 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The next WSC meeting will be on April 15 at Keller Elementary School. The third Task Force meeting will be on Wednesday, April 29, at 6:00 p.m. at Rose Hill Middle School.

 

Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force Second Meeting
March 19, 2015
The Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Lake Washington High School on March 18. Topics discussed included: 

  • The Working Subcommittee’s (WSC) work to date
  • Key topics and information for the Task Force’s policy discussion
  • Task Force guidance for priority policy issues for the WSC to pursue

Two methods were used to share the WSC’s progress with the Task Force. First, Eric Laliberte, WSC member, presented a summary of the WSC’s work to date. Mr. Laliberte focused on the main topics of WSC discussions, including: existing conditions in the district; capacity calculations; enrollment and needs projections; aging facilities issues; the district’s Capital Facilities Plan and Educational Specifications; strategies and policies to address needs; funding strategies; and frameworks for engaging with the Task Force. Next, WSC members led round robin discussions with the Task Force. The Task Force split into subgroups each with a mix of WSC members and Task Force members. Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, asked the WSC members to share about what they learned about the long-term facilities planning needs and funding, and the big questions the WSC has been grappling with. Each set of WSC members presented three times to different groups of Task Force members. 

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, presented the technical background of the WSC’s work to date. First, she shared the district’s mission, vision, values, and Student Profile to give the Task Force some context for the overall facilities engagement process. Next, Ms. Fogard explained the two challenges for long-term facilities planning: lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities. She presented information on capacity and enrollment projections, building conditions, the district’s Educational Specifications and Standard of Service, and strategies to address need.

Ms. Mabie guided the Task Force through a discussion of priority policy issues for the WSC to pursue further. First, she presented a framework for the WSC’s work to date, as well as the results of community input from the second online open house survey. The Task Force then used an online polling system to provide guidance on each policy question identified by the WSC as a potential priority. The meeting concluded with a discussion of additional items and priorities for the WSC to investigate further.

View a detailed summary of the March 18 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The next WSC meeting will be on April 1 at Peter Kirk Elementary School.

 

Working Subcommittee continues discussions
Mar
ch 13, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the Lake Washington School District’s (the district) Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Lake Washington High School on March 11. Associate Principal Prato Barone led a tour of the school for the WSC, Task Force members, and guests. After the tour, the WSC met in the commons and discussed the following topics:

  • Framing the WSC’s work to date
  • Follow-up requests from the WSC including: information for strategies to address lack of classroom capacity, maximizing use of space, and enrollment data
  • Preparation for the March 18 Task Force meeting

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, framed the WSC’s work to date by outlining the roles of the Task Force and the WSC. She explained the facilities planning process and how the WSC’s work fits into this process. Penny emphasized that the WSC needs to focus on long term approaches, not just short term challenges, noting that these long term approaches will also inform intermediate strategies. An important part of this approach is to remain focused on more high-level analysis, rather than specific details that may need to be explored in further detail at a later date.

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, addressed the WSC’s follow-up requests for additional information on strategies to address lack of classroom capacity. She presented further research and models for year round schools and double shifting, and then discussed enrollment data and capacity projections across the district. Ms. Fogard explained a chart that shows capacity projections at each school in the district, and the WSC noted that this resource would be helpful to pass on to the Task Force.

Ms. Mabie guided the WSC through preparation for the second Task Force meeting. Information was provided about: the district’s Educational Specifications and Standard of Service, the WSC’s work to date, community feedback from the Online Open House, and how to prioritize policy issues for the Task Force. The WSC discussed how to present information effectively to the larger group, and highlighted the importance of bringing the Task Force up to speed with the WSC’s progress.

View a detailed summary of the March 11 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The second Task Force meeting will be on Wednesday, March 18, at 6:30 p.m. at Lake Washington High School. The next WSC meeting will be on April 1 at Peter Kirk Elementary School.

 

LWSD Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force meeting rescheduled to March 18
March 10, 2015
The next meeting of the Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force has been rescheduled to March 18. This schedule change will allow the Task Force’s Working Subcommittee to meet again on March 11 to prepare to share their work with the Task Force on March 18.

In addition, the schedule change will give the Task Force additional time to review process materials and community input from the online open house that closes on March 11.

The Task Force’s Working Subcommittee will meet at Lake Washington High School from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on March 11. The Task Force will meet at Lake Washington High School from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on March 18. [Corrected date.] Both meetings are open to the community.

 

Working Subcommittee reviews low-cost strategies, discusses options
March 5, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the Lake Washington School District’s (the district) Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at Juanita High School on Thursday, March 5. Principal Gary Moed led a tour of the school for the WSC, Task Force members, and guests. After the tour, the WSC met in the library and discussed the following topics:

  • Maximizing the use of facility space to address lack of classroom capacity
  • Year round schools and double shifting as strategies to address lack of classroom capacity
  • Preparation for recommendations to the Task Force at their second meeting

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, addressed the WSC’s request to research how the district can maximize use of space. Information was provided about: how school capacity is calculated, utilization rates, and options to increase capacity by modifying the district’s standard of service. The WSC contemplated the question “Can the district maximize school capacity without jeopardizing level of service?” by looking at options such as eliminating resource rooms, eliminating elementary computer labs, and other space efficiency suggestions.

Ms. Fogard presented information gleaned from research about year round, multi-track schools and double shifting (two full sessions of school each day) to address lack of capacity issues.  She provided generic examples of how these strategies could be implemented. The WSC discussed benefits and challenges of these strategies and possible adaptation of them to meet the district’s need. They will look further at these possible adaptations at future meetings.

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, guided the WSC through a discussion of potential priority topics and recommendations for the Task Force to consider at their second meeting. The WSC decided to focus the Task Force’s discussion on some overarching policy issues concerning long-term facilities planning before contemplating benefits and challenges with specific strategies. The WSC also discussed potential methods for communicating effectively with the Task Force.

View a detailed summary of the March 5 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The WSC’s next meeting will be on Wednesday, March 11 at Lake Washington High School. A tour of the High School will start at 5:00 p.m. and the WSC’s regular meeting will begin at 6:00 p.m. The Task Force’s next meeting has been moved to Wednesday, March 18, at Lake Washington High School.

 

LWSD Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force seeks input
March 3, 2015
Lake Washington School District’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force seeks input on potential strategies and policies to address the district’s challenges of a classroom space shortfall and of aging facilities. This community input is being gathered in preparation for the Task Force meeting on March 11. Read more.

 

Working Subcommittee reviews funding options and potential long-term strategies
February 18, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the Lake Washington School District’s (the district) Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center on February 18, 2015. Topics discussed included: 

  • The district’s responses to questions asked by the WSC during their Feb. 5 meeting
  • Benefits and challenges of different facilities funding options
  • Priority topics for the Task Force to consider for long-term strategies to address capacity and aging facilities

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, addressed the questions asked by the WSC during their second meeting on Feb. 5. Information was provided about: the use of prototypical schools as a way to reduce building design time; the potential for additions or expansions of existing schools; and green portables. WSC members who met with district staff on Feb. 11 reported back to the group about their detailed discussion of the district’s capacity and enrollment projections and shared some outcomes of the meeting. Notes are pending from that session. 

Ms. Fogard presented an overview of the district’s potential options for school construction funding. She explained that projects are typically funded by a combination of local and state sources. She guided the WSC through the different sources, their funding requirements and the benefits and challenges of each. 

The WSC discussed the district’s options for funding facility construction. Among other options, they considered ways to better inform the community of the district’s funding constraints and the limitations of state funding and impact fees. 

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, guided the WSC through a discussion of potential priority topics for the Task Force to consider on March 11. The WSC identified a number of issues that they are interested in bringing to the Task Force including considering private funding as a strategy, considering “future-proofing” new schools by building for additional capacity, considering the role of portable classrooms in addressing capacity needs, and ways the district can approach funding in the future. 

At their March 5 meeting the WSC will take a tour of Juanita High School and delve further into priorities they want to share with the Task Force. 

View a detailed summary of the February 18 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The WSC’s next meeting will be on Thursday, March 5 at Juanita High School. A tour of the High School will start at 5:00 p.m. and the WSC’s regular meeting will begin at 6:00 p.m.

Long-Term Facilities Planning Working Subcommittee reviews current facility strategies
February 5, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the district’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center on February 5, 2015. Topics discussed included:

  • Strategies considered by the district to address lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities, 
  • Implications of state legislative class size decisions, 
  • Design and construction standards, constraints and assumptions, 
  • The pros and cons of the district’s strategies

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent, reviewed the strategies the district has considered for addressing lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities. She guided the WSC through a series of tables that showed them the benefits and challenges of each strategy the district has used to address long-term facility need. 

The WSC discussed the district’s strategies for addressing lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities. Among other questions they asked Ms. Fogard and Director of Support Services Forrest Miller to clarify how strategies like double-shifting will affect the lives of families and what it would look like to address enrollment by sending new students to schools with available space instead of enrolling them in their local school. WSC members also suggested considering partnering with local businesses to help find additional capacity as a strategy. 

Ms. Fogard guided the WSC through two charts looking at the implications of the McCleary decision and Initiative 1351 which could change funding for classroom student / teacher ratios. She showed the WSC how the district anticipates each proposal could affect their long range facility needs, if implemented by the legislature.

Mr. Miller reviewed the district’s process for designing and building schools and explained the standards and constraints they have to consider. The WSC discussed the district’s construction process and asked, among other questions, why the district doesn’t using one design for multiple schools buildings and whether or not the district needs to adjust the guidelines they use for school construction. The WSC also discussed if there are ways to build schools that have greater capacity than they need (overbuild) by the time construction is finished to address lack of classroom capacity. 

The WSC will delve into options for funding strategies to address lack of capacity and aging facilities, and brainstorm priorities for meeting long-term facilities needs at their Feb. 18 meeting. 

View a detailed summary of the February 5 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The WSC’s next meeting will be on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center at 6:00 p.m.

 

Long-Term Facilities Planning Working Subcommittee holds first meeting
January 30, 2015
The Working Subcommittee (WSC) of the district’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force met at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center on January 28, 2015. Topics discussed included:

  • The issues affecting long-term facility needs in the district, 
  • Existing conditions of the district schools, 
  • Strategies used to address school capacity and aging facilities, and
  • The scope of work for the Task Force.

Janene Fogard, Deputy Superintendent of Operational Services, reviewed factors affecting long-term facility needs in the district. She divided the problems into two categories: lack of classroom capacity and aging facilities. Ms. Fogard provided key information concerning how the district determines capacity. She described how they measure physical building conditions using State of Washington criteria. She reviewed how building conditions meet the district’s current education specifications. Those specifications translate the district’s educational philosophy into building standards that serve the educational needs of students. 

Ms. Fogard gave an overview of the existing conditions within the district. She guided the WSC through a series of tables on existing school capacity and condition, classroom space needs, and aging facility needs. 

Ms. Fogard explained the current strategies the district has been using to address capacity and aging facilities. These strategies include building new school buildings or adding additional classrooms or portables onto existing schools. The district also has used spaces for classrooms that were originally designed for other purposes. 

Penny Mabie, a neutral facilitator from EnviroIssues, reviewed the scope of work for the Long-Term Facility Planning Task Force. The scope was developed including community input from an online open house. The WSC discussed and generally agreed their work should be focused on issues that include facilities planning, funding and options to address need. 

The WSC will delve into the benefits and challenges of current and potential strategies to address needed classroom capacity and aging facilities at their February 5 meeting. 

View a detailed summary of the January 28 meeting here. Copies of the meeting materials are available below. The WSC’s next meeting will be on Thursday, Feb. 5 at the L.E. Scarr Resource Center at 6:00 p.m.

 

Working Subcommittee begins meeting
January 28, 2015
The Working Subcommittee of the district’s Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force will hold three meetings (January 28th, February 5th, and February 18th) prior to the next full Task Force meeting, which will occur on March 11th. Over these three meetings, the Working Subcommittee will review and discuss the district’s capital facility needs and options to address these needs including funding implications. They will also discuss community input collected during the recent online open house regarding the scope of issues the Task Force should consider as part of their work.

Below are the times and locations of the upcoming Working Subcommittee meetings. The meetings are open to the public. Agendas for the meetings will be posted here prior to each meeting. After each meeting, a summary of the meeting, along with materials presented at the meeting, will be posted on this page as well.

Meeting​ ​Date ​Time ​Location ​Agenda
Working Sub-Committee ​January 28, 2015 ​6:00 pm ​L.E. Scarr Resource Center Agenda
​Working Sub-Committee ​February 5, 2015 6:00 pm L.E. Scarr Resource Center Agenda
​Working Sub-Committee ​February 18, 2015 ​6:00 pm L.E. Scarr Resource Center

Agenda

 

Lake Washington School District wants your input on long-term facilities planning - visit the online open house
January 6, 2015
This Task Force will study, analyze, and make recommendations concerning the district’s long-term facilities needs to address overcrowding and aging schools. The Task Force’s recommendation, anticipated in June 2015, will be shared with the School Board and Superintendent for their
consideration.

As part of this process, the district is engaging the broader community to better understand priorities and issues regarding facilities and to help inform the Task Force’s work. The online open house is an ongoing opportunity for you to be part of the conversation about addressing overcrowding and aging schools.Visit the online open house to learn about the district’s facilities needs. Review the Task Force process and work to date. You are invited to provide feedback on the scope of issues the Task Force should consider as it develops a long-term facilities strategy recommendation.Please visit the online open house and share your thoughts by January 23. The online open house will be updated at key milestones and will stay open until the Task Force makes its final recommendation, expected in June 2015. Visit the online open house here.

 

LWSD Task Force Begins Facility Planning Work
December 5, 2014
Lake Washington School District’s new Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force held their first meeting on Wednesday, December 3. This group consists of 63 parent, community, business, senior citizen, staff and student representatives. They will study, analyze, and make recommendations concerning the district’s long-term facilities needs. “We appreciate the interest and willingness of so many individuals to serve on the task force,” noted Dr. Traci Pierce, superintendent. “We had about 280 applications from a broad, diverse representation of our communities."Lake Washington School District is one of the fastest-growing school districts in King County over the last two school years. Current enrollment stands at 26,615. It is projected to grow to close to 30,000 by 2021-22. Current classroom space in the district will not accommodate these growing numbers. In addition, the district must address some aging facilities. The district's last three bond measures did not garner the 60 percent voter approval needed to pass.At the first meeting, Dr. Pierce welcomed the group. She provided a district overview. School Board President Jackie Pendergrass thanked the task force members for their involvement. Deputy Superintendent for Operations Janene Fogard presented information and data on current capacity and enrollment. She also reviewed historical information related to the original modernization phases established in 1997. Fogard provided information on past bonds and levies and their outcomes. Read more. 

Materials from December 3, 2014 Meeting:

 

LWSD Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force seeks Volunteer
October 23, 2014
Lake Washington School District invites applicants interested in serving on a Long-Term Facilities Planning Task Force. This group will study, analyze, and make recommendations concerning the district’s long-term facilities needs. The district seeks 41 parents (one from each neighborhood school plus the three Choice high schools with their own campus), two members of the business community, two senior citizens, and four community members at large. Read more.

 

Board study session covers long-term facility planning process
September 22, 2014
This study session included: 

  •  History of community engagement in long-term school facility planning processes
  • Review of current and projected facility, capacity and enrollment situation
  • Review and discussion of community engagement plan for long-term facility planning process

The board materials from the study session are available here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Do I...
 

 How to Participate

 

Provide input via the online open house

 

Sign up to receive email updates about the long-term facilities planning task force

 

Follow LWSD on Facebook and Twitter

 

 Helpful References